Sunday, December 23, 2007

The most played songs on my iPod.

It's very late and I'm waiting for my laundry to dry and since I have not yet seen Sweeney Todd (curses), I needed something to fill the void, so I decided to play around with my iPod/itunes. I was curious to see what my top 25 playlist consisted of, so I thought I'd share:

1. "Not on Your Nellie," Darling of the Day, OBCR (Jule Styne-Yip Harburg). Patricia Routledge's rousing music-hall eleven o'clock showstopper. It's a sheer delight from start to finish. In part because of this, and also the next entry, Routledge has become a heroine of mine. And a master class in musical comedy genius. I highly recommend the rest of the cast album. 109 plays (yeah, I've listened to it a lot...).

2. "Duet for One (The First Lady of the Land)," 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue (Leonard Bernstein-Alan Jay Lerner). Patricia Routledge once again snags this spot with her spirited rendition of this nine minute showstopper in which she portrays both Julia Grant and Lucy Hayes while discoursing on the election controversy that led to the presidency of Rutherford B. Hayes. A complete marvel of craft in both performance and writing. 60 plays.

3. "You've Got Possibilities," It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's Superman, OBCR (Charles Strouse-Lee Adams). Linda Lavin stopped the show with this cleverly written song in which her character tries to seduce Clark Kent. 46 plays.

4. "Sez I/If It Isn't Everything," Donnybrook, OBCR (Johnny Burke). Peter Filichia referred to this in an article as the greatest opening number you've never heard. I will not disagree. The only fitting description I can use would be to consider it a feisty Irish cousin to "Waitin' for My Dearie" and "Many a New Day," Joan Fagan nails this energetic number out of the ballpark. Now if we could only get a CD release. 44 plays.

5. "The Golden Ram," Two by Two, OBCR (Richard Rodgers-Martin Charnin). Okay, so I'm a huge fan of Madeline Kahn. Extraordinarily huge. This brief exercise in coloratura hysterics is the only cast album which showcases Kahn's soprano at its peak (she had vocal problems the day On the Twentieth Century was recorded, though apparently no one in the production team cared). That's a full-out high C with which she caps the number. 44 plays.

6. "Another Hundred People," Company, OBCR (Stephen Sondheim). One of the most ingenious orchestrations ever given a theatre song, Pamela Myers definitive rendition is always something I listen to with earnestness and appreciation. From the melody, to the lyric, to the context, it is one of the most satisfying moments in a musical (and subsequent album) that Stephen Sondheim has given us. 44 plays.

7. "Come You Men," A Time for Singing, OBCR (John Morris-Gerald Freedman). Granted the running time is brief (1:20), which probably led to numerous plays over the previous months; but the song itself is the stirring opening to the cast album of this devastatingly short-lived musical adaptation of How Green Was My Valley. This track is an a capella chorale in the Welsh tradition that is incredibly stirring and melodically gorgeous. 44 plays.

8. "A Time for Singing," A Time for Singing, OBCR. Tessie O'Shea gets great material in this show, but her rousing and spirited rendition of the title song will send you to hit the repeat button again and again. A jubilant waltz, the song also takes on for me, a personal philosophy of what the singing in a musical can do. Hear the words of the first verse, and you'll understand. Another LP album that needs a remastered CD release. 38 plays.

9. "The Girl Who Has Everything," Grey Gardens, OBCR (Scott Frankel-Michael Korie). When I first saw this musical, it was on Broadway, where this number had replaced the song "Toyland" featured on the original cast recording from Playwrights Horizons. When the new album came out, this soaring operetta waltz, which took on considerable gravity within the show's context, was oft repeated, especially for the stunning vocal flourish with which Christine Ebersole ended the number. 37 plays.

10. "The Revolutionary Costume for Today," Grey Gardens, OBCR. I would consider this the finest list song Broadway has had in years, if not decades. The list espoused by Little Edie in this act two opening showstopper is a feat of expository writing in an opening number. (I consider GG two linked one-act musicals, since the styles are so very different). You receive so much about setting, time and character in just the words, and even the amusing "Da-da-da-DA-dummm." which fills the pauses between songs. Genius. 37 plays.

The rest of the top 25: "We Need a Little Christmas," Mame OBCR (Jerry Herman); "Turkey Lurkey Time," Promises, Promises OBCR (Bacharach-Hal David); "I Was a Shoo-In," Subways Are for Sleeping OBCR (Styne-Comden & Green); "It's Enough to Make a Lady Fall in Love," Darling of the Day OBCR; "Mame," Mame OBCR; "Home Sweet Heaven," High Spirits OBCR (Hugh Martin-Timothy Gray); "Raunchy," 110 in the Shade, New BCR (Harvey Schmidt-Tom Jones); "Let's See What Happens," Darling of the Day, OBCR; "Rehab," Back to Black, Amy Winehouse (not everything is theatre 24/7...); "Ice Cream," She Loves Me, OBCR (Bock & Harnick); "Carnegie Hall (Do-Do-Re-Do)" On the Town, 1960 studio cast (Bernstein-Comden & Green; God, that ride-out!); "Thank God I'm Old, Barnum, OLCR (Cy Coleman-Michael Stewart); "Fable," The Light in the Piazza (Adam Guettel); "For Once in My Life," Stevie Wonder (see Winehouse); "And This is My Beloved," Kismet, Lincoln Center revival CR (Borodin; Wright & Forrest).

2 comments:

What fresh hell is this? said...

THERE IS LIFE OUTSIDE OF SHOWTUNE-LAND, KEVKEV!!!!!!!

Hahaha. Good songs, though.

Theatre Aficionado at Large said...

I know. I call that fresh hell my job.