Monday, May 19, 2008

Has anyone ever seen a real showstopper?

Terry019 opened up this thread on All That Chat today and I had to share:

"Has anyone ever seen a real literal show-stopper? The only one I've seen in many years of going to the theater was the very short-lived "1600 Pennsylvania Ave". It followed a number performed by Patricia Rutledge where she sung at once as both Lucy Hayes and Julia Grant. She then exited (her scene finished)and the actors assembled for the next scene. The audience however would not stop screaming and applauding. They tried to continue the show but the audience would have none of it. Finally, Ms. Rutledge returned, in a robe since she had obviously changed out of ther costume and received the audience's adulation. It was only then that the show continued. That was a REAL show-stopper. Anyone else have an experience like that?"

As much as I love hearing about my favorite show-stopper, alas I wasn't alive to see it. In my theatre-going experiences, I have seen numbers stop the show, in varying ways, sometimes that extra burst of applause that keeps the praise going just a little longer than usual to the audience out of their seats going nuts sort of deal. Or sometimes, a great star appears onstage and that in itself is cause for the audience to erupt in an overwhelming display of vocal affection. The first memorable experience with a showstopping moment was the day my life changed forever. That was May 30, 2004 at the Shubert Theatre, where Bernadette Peters was playing her final performance in the Gypsy revival. Sondheim got entrance applause during the overture as he ducked into his seat. The overture got a standing ovation - and that itself should have warned for the Vesuvius to come minutes later. People were anticipating the moment. And there she was, in the back of the house shouting out "Sing out..." I didn't hear the Louise. I don't think anyone did. People rose as she walked down the aisle of the theatre, with the same reverence one would give at a commencement or wedding. Except we were loud, and there was no stopping us. They finished the scene and Bernadette had to wait until we were ready to let her go on. And that boys and girls was the first time I saw a show legitimately stopped. There were several other moments that very day, especially the "Turn." Now, the theatregoing experience remains ranked high on my list of events, but it was because of that show I met Noah, and indirectly how I met Sarah, two of the great theatregoers whom I admire and respect greatly. Let's face it, if it weren't for BP, I wouldn't be typing this blog at this very minute, because Sarah and Noah would never have convinced me to do it. So for that, one must be grateful to the kewpie-diva supreme.

Others that followed, Hugh Jackman's "Once Before I Go" in The Boy From Oz, "La Cage Aux Folles" and "I Am What I Am" in the revival of La Cage Aux Folles. Brian Stokes Mitchell's "This Nearly Was Mine" at the Carnegie Hall South Pacific (what you've seen on TV and heard on record is cut down considerably from the lengthy ovation he received that night). At the closing performance o The Light in the Piazza, several numbers got extended applause including "Statues and Stories," "Il Mondo Era Vuoto," and "Dividing Day" (with an emphasis on the latter). Christine Ebersole's entrance as Little Edie at the top of Act Two in Grey Gardens brought about an immediate standing ovation until Ebersole's hands-on-hips pose broke and she covered her mouth from the emotional response she had. When it died down, someone shouted out "We love you" and completely as Little Edie, she countered with heartfelt "Oh - and I love all of you too." and immediately continued into "The Revolutionary Costume for Today." Audra's "Raunchy" at a Saturday matinee of 110 in the Shade brought the proceedings to a screeching halt; "Totally Fucked" at Spring Awakening; and it goes without saying Patti LuPone as Rose last summer at the City Center and on her opening night at the St. James had a couple of showstopping moments, including the "Turn." Paulo Szot's "This Nearly Was Mine" on the opening night of South Pacific. Juan Diego Florez's "Pour mon ame" from La Fille du Regiment; Emily Pulley's "Duet for One (The First Lady of the Land)" at A White House Cantata. And most recently, Beth Leavel's "Where-Has-My-Hubby-Gone Blues" at Encores! No, No, Nanette.
The only time I've seen that sort of reaction at a play was the opening night of August: Osage County after the second act button. The roaring of approval from the audience continued after the house lights had come up after intermission. I've never had that experience at a drama before, and doubt there are many plays that offer a moment of such adrenalized electricity.

What are yours, folks?

3 comments:

SarahB said...

May 30, 2004 will always remain a day of infamy for us and indeed, thank you Bernadette.

The biggest showstopping moment I witnessed was at Wall to Wall Sondheim when Angela Lansbury and George Hearn took the stage for A Little Priest. It actually started before she even took the stage, then again as she sang the first words, "Seems a downright shame," then again at the end. It was the biggest roar that I've ever heard.

Esther said...

"Everything's Coming Up Roses" during Gypsy at City Center Encores last summer was an authentic, thrilling show-stopper. Everyone was up on their feet cheering. The energy level was sky high. It was so incredibly exciting, truly one of my most memorable moments in a theatre.

Roxie said...

Patti's "Turn" of course

and just about every number in Follies @ Encores

I'll think of more, I'm sure...